What’s Your Vagina Supposed to Smell Like?

What’s Your Vagina Supposed to Smell Like?

by -
1 36829
twitter: @rachelgbender
Prev1 of 3Next
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

Few things make women feel more insecure than wondering whether they smell fresh down there, especially as a guy is about to give pleasure of the oral variety. As he wanders south, it’s one thing to realize that you haven’t gotten a wax in a while—something the guy you’re with isn’t likely to notice in the dark. But if you’re feeling vulnerable and stressing about whether you’re emitting a funky odor, you can pretty much bet that the mood is ruined. The sad fact is that so many women are self-conscious about their vaginal scent when there’s really nothing to be embarrassed about. “I think women have unrealistic expectations about their scent that are similar to the unrealistic expectations we have about body size,” said Sara Gottfried, M.D., founder and medical director of The Gottfried Center for Integrative Medicine in Oakland, Calif., and author of The Hormone Cure. She continued:

“There’s so much shame around the normal range of what women smell like. I think of the advances we’ve made with women’s rights and the benefits we’ve had from the women’s movement, but we’re also still stuck with this mindset that women are expected to be nice, pretty and for their lady parts to smell really good, like some fake scent. Like you’re going to smell like a gardenia. And that’s just going to make you miserable because that’s not the normal human scent.”

READ MORE: 5 Sex Positions That Boost Emotional Intimacy 

The thing is, vaginas aren’t supposed to smell like fragrant flowers — despite the plethora of products marketed to women that may convince you that the scent of a rose garden should be wafting from your private parts at all times. On the other hand, vaginas aren’t supposed to smell “fishy” either (that mean barb that boys lob at girls to make them feel bad in junior high school).What’s normal appears to be somewhere in between those two extremes. Some women have no vaginal scent whatsoever, while others have a slight scent that isn’t unpleasant. What’s more, your scent can change over the course of the month. The key is to know what’s normal for you—so you’ll know there’s nothing to worry about, as well as when there’s a health problem at play.

READ MORE: 9 Tips to Give the Perfect Blow Job 

Prev1 of 3Next
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

View All

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Rachel Grumman Bender
Rachel Grumman Bender is an award-winning freelance health and beauty writer and editor. She writes regularly for The New York Times and has written for Women's Health, Yahoo Health, Everyday Health, the New York Post, Cosmopolitan, and many more publications. Rachel has held Health Editor positions at YouBeauty.com and Cosmopolitan magazine. She earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism at Boston University and her master’s degree in journalism at New York University. She lives in northern California with her husband and her twins.
  • Emma Davis

    Nice read Thank you, I have had a personal experience that I would like to share with you here so that others who are in some situations may find it helpful.I have suffered form vaginal odor for very long until one day my best friend told me something I should try. Her solution was so simple that I completely did not believe her! I thought for a moment that she might be mocking me. She must have seen my disbelief, because she went on to explain that it was an ages-old remedy with an astounding success rate.So, I went ahead and tried it. And since that day I haven’t had any vaginal odor or Bacterial Vaginosis problem.