How to Create a Faux Bob

Here's how to try before you buy.

If you watched the Emmys this year, you probably noticed the overload of chic bobs parading down the red carpet. From Sarah Hyland to Taraji P. Henson, everyone in Hollywood seems to have gotten pretty courageous at their last hair appointment.

Among all the short crops were a few imposters—specifically Kerry Washington and Clare Danes, who got in on the trend but with zero commitment. Enter the faux bob phenomenon. Because, cutting feels so final, right? And if you’re used to your longer locks, you may want to try before you buy…or snip.

“I think a bob is great for the fall/winter season,” Scunci stylist Laura Polko tells YouBeauty. “Faux bobs are especially useful because scarves, hats and hoodies can knot up your long hair. Doing a faux bob is not only simple but also keeps long hair breakage-free!”

To learn exactly how to create a faux bob at home, we went to Kerry’s stylist herself, Takisha Sturdivant-Drew. The key? “The faux bob works best on medium-length hair!”

1. Prep the hair. “I shampooed Kerry’s hair with the Neutrogena Anti-Residue Shampoo to remove the buildup off her hair and scalp,” Takisha explains. She then conditioned with Neutrogena Triple Moisture Deep Recovery Hair Mask, “an intensive moisture treatment that restores shine and leaves the hair so soft and lustrous.”

2. Add heat protection. Takisha then applied Neutrogena Triple Moisture Silk Touch Leave-In Cream evenly throughout the damp hair, starting at the roots and working her way to the ends. “This will keep her hair shiny all day without any fly away strands or frizz.”

3. Blow-dry and flatiron. “I used my Super Solano blow dryer with the comb attachment to blow dry Kerry’s hair straight with medium heat,” says Takisha. Then, part hair in large sections throughout and flat iron on low heat. “The key to blow-drying on medium and flat ironing the hair on low heat is to keep some texture in the hair,” she notes.

Need extra texture? If your hair lacks natural texture, add more volume and grit by working a volumizing mousse into wet hair before drying—we like Drybar Southern Belle Volumizing Mousse, $26.

4. Curl. Use a 1-inch curling iron—Takisha used stylist favorite, Hot Tools Marcel—and wrap small sections of hair clockwise and counterclockwise, holding each for five seconds to give hair a distinct wave and pattern. “Using a Marcel iron leaves the hair loose,” Takisha explains. “Other curling irons would have more of a tight wave and curl.” Then, pin the back section into pin curls to let set.

5. Pin it up. Let the curls down; you should have the right texture. Then, take your hand and measure two fingers at the nape of your hair in the back (middle and index finger). Use medium-sized bobby pins—we like Scunci No-slip Grip Bobby Pins—and pin hair on an angle to the left in the back and then on the sides. “This way, it gives the hair a more natural look and feel. It doesn’t look forced at all,” Takisha says.

Whatever hair falls out of place, just let it be, she suggests, to keep it sexy, young and chic.

READ MORE: The Most Famous Short Hairstyles

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